State News

Black leaders want 'offensive' Fayetteville city seal changed

Posted July 15, 2015

— Black leaders in Fayetteville are calling for the removal of the image of the Market House building from the city seal, saying it is a symbol of slavery.

Past president of the Fayetteville Area Minority Lawyers Association, Allen Rogers, has written the mayor and city council asking the seal be changed. The president of the local NAACP agrees.

"I think it is offensive and I think it's divisive," Rogers said. "As we try to attract people and businesses in Fayetteville, I think it does nothing to help that cause."

Slave sales were conducted in Fayetteville near the Market House, although there is little evidence the building itself was used.

Councilman Chalmers McDougald issued a statement Tuesday saying the Market House has been a subject of controversy.

"For many people in our city, the Market House stands for something that is noble and historic. At the same time for many others in Fayetteville, the Market House is a deeply offense symbol of a brutally oppressive past," he said. "The Market House, while an integral part of our City's past, does not represent the future of our City. Fayetteville has become one of the most diverse cities in the country with people from all over the world. They symbol of our great City must likewise reflect the strength of this diversity and the many other positive aspects of our community."

McDougald said he intends to ask City Council members to direct the City Manager to rebrand the official logo by removing the Market House.

In the 1990s, Fayetteville police took the Market House image off cruisers and police patches. The fire department removed it from their uniforms.

"I don’t believe we should try to erase our history but instead learn by it and our mistakes so that we may continue to celebrate our diversity. We are not Baltimore, Charleston or Columbia we are Fayetteville, the best, most diverse and unique City in the Southeast. We as a community are not divisive or racist and if someone is having those thoughts, perhaps they should look inward and work on their own prejudice," Mayor Nat Robertson said in a statement.

119 Comments

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  • Dawn Hartley Jul 20, 2015
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    Rasim will never go away as long as the blacks continue to destroy and take everything the whites have because they are "entitled". I say we start a National Association for the Advancement of White People.

  • Gen Lee Jul 16, 2015
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    Because no one wants to hear the truth that they did more than fight in a war.

  • Jim Slaughter Jul 16, 2015
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    I find the attitude of the so-called black leaders "offensive". Remove them!

  • Joseph Shepard Jul 16, 2015
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    Strange how people praise MLK jr. knowing that he was not a paragon of virtue by any stretch of the imagination. Yet his shortcomings and failures are ignored in favor of the positives. Why should it be any different for Southern people in history? Many fought for their beliefs which many disagree with--but they ignore the positives these people had after the war ended. Chas. B. Aycock for example-an acknowledged leader in education--Robert E Lee successfully led US forces in the War with Mexico, helped develop a small college into modern day William and Mary university, he supported reconstruction of the South and the reintegration of the South into the Union. How many others can be named not for their contributions following the war, but who are now villified for standing up for what they delieved.

  • Tim Dean Jul 16, 2015
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    Black leaders wont "God" to change day into night. Wonder what else they can think of?????

  • Charles Phillips Jul 16, 2015
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    how dare you bring good common sense into this situation. i would vote your post as the smartest one on here

  • Gen Lee Jul 16, 2015
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    The problem with them attacking this one is that the Market House had nothing to do with slavery whatsoever.

  • Charles Phillips Jul 16, 2015
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    it wasn't a slave house. read the national historic site designation for the building. They sold produce and livestock downstairs and had meeting office above, that is all , no mention of slavery anywhere.

  • Ann Rallie Jul 16, 2015
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    I find music which demeans women, calls for killing policemen, using illegal drugs, uses profanity to shock and overall honoring disgusting morals, disgusting, and it should be pulled from the shelves!

  • William James Jul 16, 2015
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    Why do white southerners insist on saying symbols like this, confederate flag, or civil war monuments are about history, when the more relevant question is why should it be on government property in the first place? Honestly, if the only thing NC citizens want to memorize and honor is the Civil War, they should be ashamed. Fayetteville could have a seal of another historical building, Ft Bragg, anything not related to oppression, but nope they went with slave house. Also, I see a lot of comments about MLK statues, but he had a positive message and impact, not oppressive and civil war and racist historical figures are on hundreds of government facilities.

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