Local News

Animals seized in Chatham County raid ready for adoption

Posted August 3, 2015

A dog waits for rescuers during the Humane Society of the United States animal rescue in Pittsboro, N.C., on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2012. (Chris Keane/AP Images for The Humane Society)
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— About 190 animals rescued last month from a Chatham County farm will be available for adoption in the coming days, the Humane Society of the United States said Monday.

The animals were seized during a July 15 raid organized by the Humane Society, Chatham County Animal Services and other groups after repeated attempts to help the property owner resolve a hoarding issue failed.

Dozens of cats and dogs, as well as some livestock animals, were taken from 3190 Silk Hope Gum Spring Road, northwest of Pittsboro. The animals received medical evaluations, and many had to be treated.

“We are relieved that this key step is behind us so that we can move toward the animals finding appropriate forever homes,” said Leigh Anne Garrard, director of Chatham County Animal Services. “Our main goal from the beginning has been to ensure positive placements for all animals involved, and we have worked diligently with many partners to make sure that happens.”

The animals are being placed in shelters in North Carolina, Virginia and Washington, D.C. Some will be available for adoption immediately, while others may need more time.

“Our partners are ready and waiting to get them started on the next part of their journey,” said Kim Alboum, director with the Humane Society of the United States.

In North Carolina, the shelters include: Chatham County Animal Shelter; Safe Haven for Cats in Raleigh; SPCA of Wake County; Red Dog Farm in Greensboro; Horse Helpers of the High Country near Boone; and Carolina Waterfowl in Indian Trail.

In Virginia, the shelters include: Norfolk SPCA; Virginia Beach SPCA; Angels of Assisi; and Lost Dog and Cat Rescue.

In Washington, D.C., the animals will be available through the Washington Animal Rescue League.

“It will take a few days to get all the animals moved. We certainly hope that Chatham residents will contact our shelter,” said Garrard, “Regardless of this incident, adoptions from our shelter help us serve more animals in need.”

17 Comments

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  • Paul Jones Aug 5, 2015
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    I really suspect the "suffering" is greatly exaggerated.

    And so what if these animals are domesticated? They're still animals. Out of 150 animals, it would not be surprising that one or two might be ill. There's a world of difference between being sick and being starved to death.

    Like to many stories I've read before on WRAL about "abused" animals, I just don't believe they were abused. You have to take the claims of these do-gooders with a HUGE grain of salt.

  • Miranda McCraw Aug 4, 2015
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    Paul, your comparison to wild animals doesn't make any sense. Cats and dogs are domestic, which means they really aren't meant to fend for themselves. And sure there weren't vets that long ago, but people in our state also kept slaves and didn't let women vote that long ago. plus, if you willingly let your farm animals suffer, that's animal abuse. They have nervous systems and feel pain just like us.

    "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated."

  • Paul Jones Aug 4, 2015
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    Let me also add that, as a child on a farm, we had way more than 150 animals. At any given time, any one of them might be sick. That happens. Oh, and some parts of the farm were dirty. It's a farm. I guess I'd have to see it for myself that these animals were truly neglected or deliberately abused. As I have said, I have seen these types of people declare that puppies in a puppy mill were "emotionally distressed" while at the same time the dogs were jumping with tails waving. I don't trust them.

  • Paul Jones Aug 4, 2015
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    Matt, I don't even know what AKC is. I googled it and found "American Kennel Club". If you're suggesting I'm speaking for them, then no. I have absolutely no association with them.

    In the wild, there are no vets. For that matter, there was no such thing as a vet or medicine for animals not so long ago. There is nothing guaranteeing the safety of animals in the wild or that they can even eat tomorrow. So, why is it that this lady with a bunch of animals a problem? If they were wild animals, nobody would be doing a thing to help them.

    "But they're not wild animals". Right. The difference? These have more feelings? There's no difference.

    Abuse is one thing, but I don't think that was the case here. If the lady needed a little help, then give it to her. Why steal all of her animals? As far as I'm concerned, it is theft and these do-gooders are no doubt causing her emotional distress, too.

  • Miranda McCraw Aug 4, 2015
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    It's obvious the only thing AKC cares about is money. They obviously don't consider the well-being of dogs important or they would crack down on puppy mills and discontinue breeding policies that result in horrible genetic disorders. Then these "sub-perfect" dogs are cast aside even though it's the organization's fault they are disfigured or ill.

    That's why my favorite breed is and always will be Rescue. Adopt, don't shop!

  • Matt Wood Aug 4, 2015
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    You and the AKC are on record defending puppy mills (and I know you call that hate speech, which is all anyone on this comment board needs to know about you). Hardly the good guys.

  • Clarence Hill Aug 4, 2015
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    Matt Wood, cool off; you're to hostile. Are you being paid by HSUS or some other ARs groups--to spew your deception???? If so, how much? I don't get paid by anyone. HSUS has all the millionaires; how much does Wayne Pacelle and Kim Albourn make? If you will be honest and keep up with the total "sales" from this lady's animals--I'll bet you a milkshake, with cow's milk and ice-creamm, the total sales will exceed $50,000.00.

    No, I'm not a shill of AKC--just an admirer. Yes, AKC are the "good guys".

    No more comments. End of discussion.

  • Matt Wood Aug 4, 2015
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    Nobody listen to Paul Jones and Clarence Hill. They're AKC shills who believe people should be able to breed and own as many animals as they want regardless of the horrid care they receive as a result. They believe we should actually provide financial assistance to people who do so! Just look at their comments above and I've seen their comments on news sites across the country (seriously, it's like they're paid by the AKC to spread this idiocy all day).

    Meanwhile sane people actually realize that these animals, when placed throughout all the organizations listed, will actually be placed in loving forever homes. Despite what they say about the "sale" of the animals, what they don't realize is that these non-profit rescue organizations only charge enough money to cover the expense of recovery, microchipping, and spay/neuter programs. Many of these organizations are largely volunteer-run and those who do get paid aren't exactly millionaires.

  • Jane Tuohey Aug 4, 2015
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    The article stated that many had to be treated so that indicates that those animals were in poor condition, no one is disputing that the owner didn't love the animals, she obviously had a handful and couldn't provide the medical care that they needed. It's not about them being stolen, it's about caring for animals so that they have the quality of life that they deserve. Children is for another topic...

  • Clarence Hill Aug 4, 2015
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    Paul Jones, you are wrong--HSUS is not giving these animals to someone else. The "SALE" is on. Most of these animals are going to areas where people will pay high dollars to get them. The farm owner will not get a dime. HSUS knows how to work the system.

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