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7 myths about losing weight

Posted February 10

Have you heard these weight loss myths? (Deseret Photo)

You probably heard a lot of advice when you announced your New Year’s resolution to lose weight. But how much of that advice was false? Be aware of these seven weight loss myths:

Myth #1: Avoiding carbs will help me lose weight

Removing carbs from your diet all of a sudden can increase cravings, according to Daily Burn. Experts say you should cut down on refined carbs (like white rice, sweets, processed snacks and white pasta) but not to cut out healthy carb options such as vegetables and whole grains.

Myth #2: Don’t cheat on your diet

You should probably watch how often you have a cheat meal, but having one treat once a week won’t hurt you. In fact, Including a cheat meal makes your diet easier to get through. Follow the 90/10 rule by Medical Daily: 90 percent of your diet should be devoted to healthy food, while the other 10 percent should be cheat meals. Remember, this is only a cheat meal, not a cheat day!

Myth #3: Eating food at night leads to weight gain

This has been debated from both sides. However, many experts say that it doesn’t depend on the hour of the day that you eat, but the time between eating and sleeping that matters. “My suggestion is to eat within an hour to two hours of waking, don't go for more than four to six hours between meals, and don't eat two hours before bed,” Melissa Rifkin, MS, RD, a bariatric dietitian at Montefiore Health System in New York City, told Health. Lori Zanini, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, also recommends eating about two hours before bed to allow for digestion.

Myth #4: Keeping track of my weight will discourage me

If weighing yourself daily is causing you to feel discouragement, try reducing your time on the scale to once a week. For some people, tracking weight daily can be motivating. Do what works best for you.

Myth #5: “Low fat” and “reduced fat” foods will help me lose weight

To advertise as “low fat,” the product only needs to contain 30 percent less fat than a similar product, according to NHS. This means if this item is high in fat to begin with, the “reduced fat” product could still be pretty high in fat. It’s also important to note that low fat doesn’t mean low in calories. Always check the label.

Myth #6: Obesity has nothing to do with biology

There are many genetic variables that influence obesity, according to Authority Nutrition, one of which is being resistant to the hormone leptin. Leptin is produced by the body’s fat cells, and its job is to regulate our energy balance, according to Authority Nutrition. This means that it tells the brain that there is enough fat stored, but if someone is resistant to this hormone, it could cause them to overeat.

Myth #7: Skipping meals will help me lose weight

Studies show that people who skip breakfast are usually heavier than people who eat a healthy breakfast. Opt for a healthy breakfast rather than skipping next time. If you find yourself in a rush in the morning, prepare a smoothie the night before, or grab a yogurt on the go. Click here for a list of breakfast foods to power you through the day.

Remember to rejoice in the small accomplishments and keep persevering. Ralph Marston, author of The Daily Motivator, once said, “Your goals, minus your doubts, equal your reality.”

Shaelynn Miller is a journalist who has a passion for photography, video production and writing.

Contact her at smiller@deseretdigital.com.

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