5 On Your Side

Cary man gets overpriced resale tickets on bogus DPAC website

Posted June 12, 2012

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— When you pay big money for tickets to a big show, you don't expect problems. But that's what some fans are finding when they order tickets online.

Roy Tempke of Cary ordered two tickets to see Wicked at the Durham Performing Arts Center. They were a Mother's Day gift for his wife. "I think I'm like any guy," said Tempke. "I waited `til the last minute."

Like many of us, he quickly went online, Googled DPAC and placed his order. He paid $260 including fees.

But when the tickets arrived, he realized something was off. They looked like tickets you print at home.

"And we thought that was strange, and again even my wife commented at that point, `oh, are these real?' And I thought well, yeah, sure they are. I ordered them from the DPAC, of course they're real. I mean we paid enough for them. I hope they are," said Tempke.

Turns out, his quick Internet search landed him on a ticket reseller's website. Tempke ordered through DPAC.org instead of the venue's actual website DPACNC.com.

DPAC Double-check ticketing sites before buying

Peter Wallace is in charge of ticketing for the DPAC. "This isn't just a Durham Performing Arts Center problem. It happens at every venue, for every concert," said Wallace.

"Often times they are charging much higher than face value on the ticket and adding exorbitant service charges," he added.

When 5 On Your Side talked with Tempke, the site he'd ordered from was already gone. That was no surprise to Wallace. "Then they'll put it back up and then they'll take it down so that it's constantly changing," said Wallace.

The night of the show, the Tempkes arrived wondering whether their tickets were real, and whether they'd even get in. Someone else's name had clearly been whited-out on the tickets. "When they check you in we thought `well, that would be the moment of truth," said Tempke. "The lady checked us in and said, 'Have a great show' and we both kinda breathed a sigh of relief."

The Tempkes were relieved the tickets were legitimate, but annoyed that they cost $84 more than they would have had he bought them directly through the DPAC. "It's not fair. It's not right. It's deceptive. It's a deceptive practice," said Tempke.

The DPAC's Peter Wallace says there have been cases where tickets were not legitimate and customers had to purchase new tickets to get in. Under North Carolina's scalping law, venues can prohibit the reselling of tickets on resale sites.

The takeaway: Make sure you know where you're ordering from, and check different websites to compare prices and fees.

20 Comments

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  • trafalgerfountain Jun 21, 2012

    He deserves it for buying tickets to that nonsense. Musicals are garbage.

  • superman Jun 18, 2012

    I would be concerned now that the web site has the name and the address as well as the credit card informtion. That is unless he used Pay Pal. It is never a good idea to purchase items on the internet and give out your credit card info. Be safe and use a third party like Pay Pal. Better to be safe than sorry.

  • superman Jun 15, 2012

    He was lucky the tickets were genuine and he didnt pay a lot for something that was bogus. He may not be so lucky next time.

  • Jun 14, 2012

    "Just check out the general "for sale" listings on Craigslist. Every other ad is spam from the ticket scammers. Lots of people must be falling for it or they wouldn't keep posting every few minutes." common tater

    I purchase most of my event tickets on craigslist. I "click" on the for sale by owner tab when looking for tickets. I never pay full price and never get burned.

  • Jun 14, 2012

    The tickets were good, he was admitted to the show. Might be a good idea to pay better attention when buying anything online. Ticketmaster and the rest of the legal scalpers rip folks off on a daily basis with extra fees. He didn't have to pay the asking price, but he did. He got what he willingly paid for.

  • kcrawford27513 Jun 14, 2012

    Gravypig: My reading comprehension skills are A-OK. If I had been looking for the site that guy had gone to, then fine. But I was specifically looking for the OFFICIAL DPAC website. If he doesn't know the meaning of the word "official," then he's got bigger problems then over-paying for a ticket.

    If either 5 on Your Side can't take an extra minute to ask the obvious question to DPAC about why they allow tickets to be re-sold, why bother including that tidbit in the article?

  • dwntwnboy Jun 14, 2012

    "why does a "company" get away with it?"- heaven't you heard? The "companies" are "people" now, and those "people" buy other "people" -in elected office- so they can do whatever they want while the rest of us "people" can't, because we can't afford to buy the elected "people". :-)

  • GravyPig Jun 14, 2012

    "This guy must not be too bright. I googled both "DPAC" and "Durham Performing Arts Center" and the first listing (apart from the two ads at the top) were for the official DPAC website."

    Your reading comprehension must not be too good. I'll help you out.

    "When 5 On Your Side talked with Tempke, the site he'd ordered from was already gone. .... "Then they'll put it back up and then they'll take it down so that it's constantly changing," said Wallace."

    "Also, why didn't 5 on Your Side ask DPAC why they allow this to happen?"

    I'm pretty sure that they don't have the time or resources to check the web for scalpers.

    It all appears that this guy was in quite a rush to buy and made some mistakes by not reading things all the way through. You know how that is...right?

    Don't get me wrong, I AM being snarky. If you can't read what was in the article then you deserve some snark for calling a man "not too bright" when you rushed and made a similar error.

  • GravyPig Jun 14, 2012

    "When you know the price of the ticket and you elect to pay the asking price--just how can you complain about the cost. You dont know how to say No thank you. You eat a meal at a nice place and after the bill comes you complain about the price! My dad use to say that if you cant go first class-stay at home."

    You can complain about the cost when you have been duped into thinking you are purchasing from the correct DPAC site. He may not have taken the time to look up the prices for the tickets. If he had he would have been somewhat suspicious and maybe looked into it further. This would be different if he had purchased the tickets at the correct site and then proceeded to complain about the price. Quite different situation from the "meal at a nice place". You would complain too if you were unknowingly over charged.

    Glad his tickets were for real. Hope the show was good.

  • superman Jun 14, 2012

    When you know the price of the ticket and you elect to pay the asking price--just how can you complain about the cost. You dont know how to say No thank you. You eat a meal at a nice place and after the bill comes you complain about the price! My dad use to say that if you cant go first class-stay at home.

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