Wake County Schools

2015-16 reassignment plan could affect 2,734 Wake students

Posted November 4, 2014

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— No more than 2,734 students – less than 2 percent of the Wake County Public School System's enrollment – would be affected by a plan to fill three schools opening next year, according to a final draft of a student reassignment plan unveiled Tuesday.

School system staff told board members during a work session that fewer than half of those students would be assigned to a new school for the 2015-16 academic year, while the remaining – about 1,600 – could choose to stay in their current schools if they provide their own transportation.

An initial presentation Tuesday estimated 2,902 students would be affected, but the number was revised after a decision to keep 168 students at Enloe High School instead of moving them to Southeast Raleigh High School.

The plan to fill Friendship High School and Scotts Ridge Elementary School in Apex and Abbotts Creek Elementary School in north Raleigh is also aimed at creating efficiencies in transportation and aligning school calendars so that students remain on the same calendar from elementary to high school.

The school system has been working since August on the plan, and the latest iteration reflects changes based on more than 2,200 online comments and feedback from a number of public information sessions.

The school board is accepting online comments on the latest draft and will also hold a public hearing Nov. 18.

It will discuss the proposal at a Nov. 25 work session and take a vote Dec. 2.

The proposal, the fourth in recent years, comes as the school system – the largest in the state – is expecting an 11 percent enrollment increase, or 18,615 students, by 2018. That number would bring enrollment to 171,915.

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  • LadyWorkerBee Nov 4, 2014

    "The plan to fill Friendship High School and Scotts Ridge Elementary School in Apex and Abbotts Creek Elementary School in north Raleigh is also aimed at creating efficiencies in transportation and aligning school calendars so that students remain on the same calendar from elementary to high school." How is this creating efficiencies in transportation when some kids will move from schools 3 miles away to a school more than 12 miles away?

  • taylor3297 Nov 4, 2014

    The law stating when a school year can start and when it ends, has nothing to do with year round school and yes a school system can mandate year round schools. The law only applies to traditional calendar schools and it was passed due to a big push from the tourism lobby.

  • Sue DeMarrais Nov 4, 2014
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    View quoted thread


    The reason that a transition to more year round schools failed previously, and why it fail again - there's a law that sets the earliest date that a school year can start (but voluntarily enrolling in a year round school is fine).

  • Ryan Kurtz Nov 4, 2014
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    I just don’t understand why they won’t consider transitioning as many K-8 schools to a year-round schedule, thus taking 25% of those schools population out at any time. That way you’re relieving the overcrowded schools, not having to pay to build as many schools every year, and the building is used all year instead of being a shell for 3 months. It’s just insane that it’s not being brought to the table considering all the growth in Wake.